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MP raises issue of town’s ‘pitifully’ slow broadband


Monday 28th February 2011 (Andrew Griffiths)

BURTON’S pitifully slow broadband speeds will be discussed at a meeting between BT’s chairman and the town’s MP.

Andrew Griffiths is set to request a meeting with Sir Michael Rake after the telecoms giant began telling new customers in Burton that they could not have a broadband connection because the town’s telephone exchange was full.

“The broadband situation in Burton at the moment is unforgivable if you are trying to run a business,” Mr Griffiths said.

The MP claimed his constituency office had been inundated with pleas for help from businesses and residents subjected to BT’s shocking treatment.

Because of the sheer number of people involved I will be writing to the chairman of BT imploring him to look at the broadband situation in Burton. I will ask to meet with him and ask him to throw us a lifeline by helping to improve the efficiency of the internet locally.He said: “Because of the sheer number of people involved I will be writing to the chairman of BT imploring him to look at the broadband situation in Burton. I will ask to meet with him and ask him to throw us a lifeline by helping to improve the efficiency of the internet locally.

Mr Griffiths said he had recently spoken to a printing company that had opted against relocating to Derby Road, Burton, after learning how slow the internet connection was.

As well as the MP, the business community has also condemned BT’s response to Burton’s shoddy broadband connection.

Philip Norris, a spokesman for Burton Business Club, said: “An increasing amount of downloading and uploading content is being done by businesses.

“It is becoming a real pain, actually, to access the internet and do something useful because it takes so long. This can only have a detrimental effect on businesses in the area.”

He continued: “People have to have simple websites without download facilities because the connection is too slow and, generally speaking, this means companies can do less business.

“The slow broadband speeds have been discussed at club meetings and members find it really difficult at times. The internet service is even non-existent in parts of the area from time to time.”

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